Can world court survive African Union’s attack?

By Olivia Warham, Special for CNN On January 20, 1942 the Nazi high command gathered at a villa in the Berlin suburb of Wannsee to discuss eliminating European Jewry. One attendee expressed reservations, worrying that they might one day be held responsible. Hitler dismissed the man’s concerns, saying, “Who now remembers the Armenians?” Had Hitler lived, his rhetorical question about the Ottoman Empire’s extermination of more than 1 million of its citizens would have received a belated response at the Nuremberg war crimes trials. The African Union (AU) has called for the International Criminal Court’s charges against Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir to be dropped. As Luis Moreno Ocampo, the ICC’s chief prosecutor, departs his post, can…

HITLER DIDN’S STOP. WHY WILL SUDAN BE A DIFFERENT STORY?

By Olivia Warham, May 17, 2012 Follow The JC on Twitter Churchill described appeasement as feeding a crocodile, hoping it chooses to eat you last. If humans learned anything from the 20th century, it should have been that if you keep averting your eyes to genocide elsewhere, eventually you will have to fight to save your own neighbourhood, and you will do so at enormous cost. Alas, we have failed to draw the obvious conclusions from appeasement. Hence those who form “the international community” are responding to 21st century genocide in Sudan as if the Holocaust never happened. And whether in Armenia, Rwanda, Bosnia or Sudan, there has been a predictable pattern to the world’s reaction,…

Darfur nine years on: murder in a media vacuum

Written by Rebecca Tinsley with Olivia Warham of Waging Peace. and originally appeared in The New Statesman Earlier this month the US Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, condemned Syrian leader Bashar Assad’s “long list of broken promises”. “The world must judge Assad by what he does, not by what he says,” she added. “And we cannot sit back and wait any longer.” The same should apply to President Omer al Bashir of Sudan who has been killing, ethnically cleansing, raping, torturing and terrorizing the people of Darfur for nine years. Like Assad, Sudan’s Bashir targets his own unarmed civilians systematically and with impunity. As Darfuris mark the anniversary of the start of their rebellion on…

It is Time to Point the Finger of Blame

Written by Rebecca Tinsley with Olivia Warham of Waging Peace. Appeared originally in the Sudan Trubune Less than a year after South Sudan gained independence, some are already preparing to write its obituary. Before the January 2011 referendum, many of us predicted things would go badly unless the international community, in its role as midwife to the new nation, ensured that outstanding elements of the 2005 peace deal were resolved. These elements were not minor matters: the location of the border, how much South Sudan would pay to tranship oil across Sudan, and who was a citizen. However, everyone was in a hurry to complete the secession process and the split went ahead with the…

Sudan gives long-term residents just days to quit the country for the South

Written by Rebecca Tinsley with Olivia Warham of Waging Peace. Originally appeared in  The Guardian Imagine that everyone living in Britain who had an Irish grandparent was given nine months to leave and return to Ireland. Imagine that people with Irish grandparents were summarily fired from their jobs, and had to scramble to sell their homes and possessions – and that hundreds of thousands faced expulsion from their homes and were forced to settle in an unfamiliar country that some had never visited. Up to 700,000 southern Sudanese people living in Sudan do not have to imagine – this is the frightening situation that confronts them. Twenty years of civil war between President Bashir’s regime…

The UN: A Tale of Two Eleanors

Written by Rebecca Tinsley with Olivia Warham of Waging Peace. Appeared originally in The Huffington Post If Eleanor Roosevelt, the dynamic force behind the foundation of the United Nations, could see what is happening in Syria right now, no doubt she would weep. She would likely agree with Hillary Clinton, who last week called for Security Council unity to tackle the “horrific campaign of violence” that has “shocked the conscience of the world.” Mrs Roosevelt believed in the Big Society decades before David Cameron graduated from Bovril to Bollinger. But her vision was much grander: of a world community that acted on its best internationalist instincts, putting aside the greedy, narrow nationalism that had led…